Is it Time to Buy These Shares? Analysts Weigh in on TAL Education Group (NYSE:TAL)

Brokerage firms covering shares of TAL Education Group (NYSE:TAL) have given the stock a “Buy” rating on a consensus basis.  Using the following ratings scale: 1.0 Strong Buy, 2.0 Buy, 3.0 Hold, 4.0 Sell and 5.0 Strong Sell, analysts have an average recommendation of 2.10 on the shares.  Based on a recent trade, the shares are hovering around $33.10 which, according to analysts, yield significant upside potential to the $34.70 consensus target price.

Investors looking to secure stock market profits may be tweaking an existing strategy or looking to devise a brand new one. As the stock market keeps charging higher, investors will have to figure out how they want to play the next few months. Identifying market tops and possible correction levels may be very tricky. With the markets trading at current levels, the situation for the average investor may be widely varied. Some investors will be trading with a shorter-term plan, while others may be focused on a longer-term investment time frame. There are many financial professionals who are predicting a sharp reversal in the stock market, but there are also those who believe that the upswing will keep pushing stocks higher over the coming months. Investors will need to decide for themselves which way they think the momentum is going to swing and prepare accordingly.  

Wall Street firms hire hundreds of analysts who provide recommendations on stocks.  Typically, these analysts look at a company’s fundamentals, building financial models from this information in order to project future trends, specifically future earnings. 

These projections are then used as a basis for providing “buy” or “sell” recommendations.  Many investors consider these recommendations very seriously, and often times whenever an analyst changes their outlook on a stock, the price change almost immediately.

Analyst recommendations should be approached with caution for many reasons.  Many times a conflict of interest arises due to the relationship between company that they work for and the company whose stock they are paid to track. 

Often, analysts are responsible for creating reports on companies that are currently or could potentially be a client of their employer.  Analysts don’t want to offend any companies that could possibly be a potential client down the road, so they are inclined to put a positive spin on the stock. 

Beyond issuing buy, sell, or hold recommendations, analysts also create earnings estimates.  These are earnings per share (EPS) numbers that analysts believe a particular company will report on its next statement.  These estimates have been growing in importance on Wall Street over the years, because the companies that “beat” their estimates usually see their stock prices grow while those who don’t usually watch them shrink.

RSI 

TAL Education Group (NYSE:TAL)’s shares may have a significant upside to the consensus target of 34.70, but how has it been performing relative to the market?  The stock’s price is 33.10 and their relative strength index (RSI) stands at 67.03.  RSI is a technical oscillator that shows price strength by comparing upward and downward movements.  It indicates oversold and overbought price levels for a stock.  

TAL Education Group (NYSE:TAL) shares are moving -0.57% trading at $33.10 today.

Coming up with a viable and solid stock investment plan might be on the minds of many individual investors. A solid plan might entail defining the overall objective and recognizing tangible restraints. Figuring out these details may help the investor focus on the most important aspects of investing in the stock market. Following strategies set forth by others may work, but they may also leave the investor in a quandary. What worked in the past for one person may not work in the future for another. Investors may need to craft the plan keeping in mind the long-term goals. Although some investors and traders focus on the short-term, many investors are more interested in making the grade over a number of years, and not a number of days or months. Plans may need to be set up so that they are flexible and have the ability to withstand unforeseen shifts and rapidly changing stock market scenarios. Flexibility may end up being the key to a successful plan down the road. Investors may also want to do regular check-ins on portfolio performance in order to keep tabs on how well the plan is working.

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